Wednesday, June 16, 2010

$14 Trillion U.S. Debt really is ---> $130 Trillion

Items of Interest:

Kevin Williamson / National Review Online:
The Other National Debt -- About that $14 trillion national debt: Get ready to tack some zeroes onto it. Taken alone, the amount of debt issued by the federal government — that $14 trillion figure that shows up on the national ledger — is a terrifying, awesome, hellacious number: Fourteen trillion seconds ago, Greenland was covered by lush and verdant forests, and the Neanderthals had not yet been outwitted and driven into extinction by Homo sapiens sapiens, because we did not yet exist. Big number, 14 trillion, and yet it doesn’t even begin to cover the real indebtedness of American governments at the federal, state, and local levels, because governments don’t count up their liabilities the same way businesses do...

The debt numbers start to get really hairy when you add in liabilities under Social Security and Medicare — in other words, when you account for the present value of those future payments in the same way that businesses have to account for the obligations they incur...

Now, these aren’t perfect numbers, but that’s the rough picture: Call it $130 trillion or so, or just under ten times the official national debt. Putting Nancy Pelosi in a smaller jet isn’t going to make that go away.

discussion:
Financial Armageddon: 'Call It $130 Trillion or So'
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Wall Street Journal:
America's Municipal Debt Racket -- State and local borrowing as a percentage of U.S. GDP has risen to an all-time high of 22% in 2010.

New Jersey officials recently celebrated the selection of the new stadium in the Meadowlands sports complex as the site of the 2014 Super Bowl. Absent from the festivities was any sense of the burden the complex has become for taxpayers.

Nearly 40 years ago the Garden State borrowed $302 million to begin constructing the Meadowlands. The goal was to pay off the bonds in 25 years. Although the project initially went according to plan, politicians couldn't resist continually refinancing the bonds, siphoning revenues from the complex into the state budget, and using the good credit rating of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition authority to borrow for other, unsuccessful building schemes.

Today, the authority that runs the Meadowlands is in hock for $830 million, which it can't pay back. The state, facing its own cavernous budget deficits, has had to assume interest payments—about $100 million this year on bonds that still stretch for decades...
related:
WSJ Deal Blog:
Warren Buffett Worries About Muni Defaults. -- Warren Buffett is warning of a “terrible problem” in municipal debt and has trimmed his investments. The cost of insuring municipal debt – through credit default spreads — has increased as some communities, such as Central Falls, R.I., have inched closer to insolvency...

USDebtClock.org
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Investors Business Daily / Real Clear Markets:
Fannie & Freddie: The Mother of All Bailouts -- The taxpayer cost of bailing out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac could be as high as $1 trillion. Yet Democrats still refuse to reform the toxic twins, making reform meaningless...
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Tom Stone:
Homeless -- keeping faith ... homeless woman, san francisco

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